7 Things to Know About the 500-Calorie Diet

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The exact number of calories you need depends on your age, gender, body size and activity level. A ketogenic diet has been proven to help you lose weight and fight metabolic disease. Although today's program is not as stringent as the original liquid fast Medifast launched decades ago, the low-fat, relatively low-carb plan is designed to bring about rapid weight loss by coaxing your body into a "fat-burning state" known as ketosis. Certainly, you will lose weight if you reduce the calories you eat. NutriSystem's stock is owned by a number of of retail and institutional investors. In the Zone Delivery Cost:

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The maximal heart rate is age dependent, for as we grow older, the heart beats a little more slowly. To find maximal heart rate, subtract your age from The fat burning and cardio zones are defined as a percentage of this maximal heart rate.

A heart-rate zone that improves cardiovascular fitness is defined as between 55 and 80 percent of maximum heart rate, according to The American College of Exercise. A less-conditioned individual may see benefits to her heart health at the lower levels of this recommended zone while an athlete needs to work at a higher intensity to improve fitness. The fat-burning zone occurs at the lower end of the cardio zone—between 55 and 70 percent of maximum heart rate.

When working at this intensity, a greater percentage of calories burned comes from stored fat. Working anywhere within the cardio zone will improve cardio fitness and burn calories. The benefit of working in the fat-burning zone is that you target stored fat and thus encourage weight loss. But, keep in mind, that if you work in a higher zone, you burn a greater amount of calories overall—which is important to weight loss. Although a lower percentage of these calories will come from fat sources, the total number of fat calories burned will likely be the same or greater.

Take, for example, a person who burns calories in a minute walk at a heart rate of 55 percent of maximum. Seventy-five percent of those calories, or 75 calories, may come from fat.

Set two benches parallel to one another a little wider than shoulder-width apart. Get between the benches and hold yourself up with your arms so that your body forms an L shape. Your torso should be perpendicular to the floor, your arms straight at your sides and your legs out in front of you, parallel to the floor.

The Best Exercise for Ripped Abs. Your body will form an L shape. While holding this position, perform pull-ups, pulling your chest up to the bar while pulling your shoulders back and down. Return to the bottom of the pull-up, but keep your legs in the L shape. The Best Core Workout Routines. Even though this exercise has it's roots in yoga, don't let that fool you as to it's intensity. Get a or pound weight plate and hold it in front of your chest as you come to the top of a modified boat pose -- seated, leaning back, legs in a tabletop, weight in front of your chest.

Hold this position as you breathe in and out through your nose, keeping your abs contracted and preventing your lower back from curving. Take a break for 30 seconds and catch your breath.

Fastest Ways to Get a Six-Pack. Concentrate on pressing your lower back into the floor at the beginning of each rep by pinning your navel to your spine. This will engage your pelvic floor throughout the exercise. Lie on your back with your legs straight. Hold your arms straight above your head, gripping a medicine ball so your elbows are by your ears.

Without bending your elbows or knees, contract your abdominal muscles, fold your body up by lifting your arms and legs off the floor and stretch your arms toward your toes.

Keep your back straight. Pause, then return to the starting position. Stand next to a cable station with a rope attachment, the stack on your right. Kneel on your right knee closest to the base of the cable , your left knee bent 90 degrees.

Grab the rope with both hands and stretch it taut, holding it down below your right hip. Return to start, repeat and switch sides. Squats tax your core already. Moving the weight over your head makes maintaining your proper squat form even more difficult. What keeps that form correct? Stand with your feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart, toes turned out slightly.

Grab a barbell with an overhand grip, hands shoulder-width apart, and raise it overhead so your shoulders are roughly in line with your heels. Keep your arms straight and directly overhead as you push your hips back to squat down until your thighs are at least parallel to the floor. Press back up to standing. Kettlebell Exercises for the Abs. Most non-crunch core moves focus on rotation. But your core also functions to resist rotation -- the world tries to wrench you into a twist, and your torso keeps you from getting pulled.

Stand with a cable at waist level on your right. Pull the cable out and hold it against the front of your chest with both hands, knees slightly bent. The cable should be taut. Hold your core tight. Maintaining this body position, press the cable straight out away from your chest. The cable will try to rotate you toward the station, but resist it.

Return the handle to your chest and repeat. Grab a pair of pound weight plates and hold them together directly in front of your chest, smooth sides facing out.

Spread your fingers wide on the plates. Squeeze the plates together as you press them forward until your arms are pointing straight out in front. Return the plates to your chest and repeat. Put the car in neutral and give it a shot. On a long, flat stretch of pavement, have a friend put a car in neutral. Stand behind the car and put your hands on the trunk about shoulder-width apart.

Awesome name for a double-duty move. Keeping your hips level as you row each dumbbell to your shoulder will tax your core while you train your lats. Assume a push-up position while holding a dumbbell in each hand directly below your shoulders. Your body should form a straight line from head to heels. Maintaining this body line, bend your elbows until your chest is between the dumbbells. Press back to start, then bend one elbow to row the weight up next to your rib cage. Return it to the floor, do another push-up and repeat on the other side.

As with the renegade row, this move engages your lats while you stabilize your core. Lie on your left side in a side-plank position facing a low cable pulley. Prop yourself up on your left elbow with feet stacked and body forming a straight line from head to heels.

Row the handle of the cable machine with your right arm until your hand is in line with your torso. Return the cable to start and repeat. Then switch sides and repeat.

Placing weight on one side of an exercise means your core has to work to keep your body upright. Stand holding a dumbbell at your right side. Take a large step forward with your left leg, lowering as you step until your knees both form degree angles. Press back to standing and repeat. For an added challenge, try moving the weight to your shoulder then straight overhead or to the other arm.

Your core fires first in moves like these and stabilizes your torso to let you use the rest of your strength to do the move. Lie on your back with arms at your sides, palms down, legs extended. Lift your legs perpendicular to the ground so the soles of your feet face the ceiling.

Keeping your legs straight, lower your right leg until it hovers just a few inches off the ground. Your left leg should still be sticking straight up. Return your right leg to the top, lower your left leg and repeat. It has to fire in all kinds of moves, especially squats. Throw in a row and, well…you get it. Stand facing a cable machine stack set at shoulder- or waist-height. Grab the handle with your left hand.

Stand on your right leg with your knee slightly bent, your left leg trailing behind you. Push your hips back to squat with your right leg. As you stand back up, bring your left leg forward so your knee is up in a marching position and row the cable to your side. Return to start, repeat and switch arms and legs. This move is pretty much the pinnacle of side-plank progressions. Lie on your right side, prop up on your right hand with your hand directly beneath your shoulder and arm straight.

Your feet should be stacked on top of each other, your body forming a straight line from head to heels. Extend your left arm so that your body forms a T.

Maintaining this rigid body line, separate your legs, raising your left leg until your body forms a five-pointed star. Hold this position for as long as you can maintain a rigid torso.

Repeat on the other side. Stand with a staggered stance, your left leg slightly in front of your right. Grab the hammer with your left hand at the base of the handle and your right up closer to the head. As you bring the hammer up, your right hand should slide down to meet your left. Once you reach your shoulder, swing the hammer down and slam the tire. Repeat on the other side, with legs and hands switched. Balancing on a Swiss ball is tough enough. Try maintaining perfect form while intentionally throwing your stability off.

Prop yourself on a stability ball in plank position with your elbows on the ball, feet on the floor and body forming a straight line from head to feet. Maintain this rigid body line as you move your elbows beneath your shoulders to rotate the ball in a small counterclockwise circle beneath your chest. Talk about mimicking real life! Grab a heavy dumbbell and hold it at your side in one hand as you would a suitcase.

Walk forward while maintaining an erect posture and keeping your shoulders level. Stand with a loaded barbell at your feet. Bend forward at the waist, knees slightly bent and grab the bar with an overhand grip. Roll the bar out, keeping your toes on the ground, until your body is straight in a full-extension position.

Now use your core -- not your arms -- to pull the bar back toward your body and return to the bent-over position. Lifting your arm and opposite leg while maintaining core stability and keeping your hips level is tough enough. The size of the ball is key.

Lie facedown on a Swiss ball, with the ball under your belly button. The balls of your feet and your palms should be on the floor almost in a push-up position over the ball. Hold for a second, return to start and lift your right arm and left leg.

Alternate in this way. In one study from , the jackknife was found to be the best core exercise for targeting the lower abs.

Start in push-up position with your shins on a Swiss ball. Without rounding your lower back, contract your abs and use your feet to pull the ball toward your chest by bending your knees.

What did the study find?